About

Satakunta Museum is located on the border of “Kivi-Pori”, the district of brick and stone buildings from the 19th century and early 20th century in the Pori city centre. The museum’s raw Brutalist-style concrete façades form a strict contrast to the surrounding revival style buildings.

Satakunta Museum represents the typical museum architecture of the time; the functions define the brief and the overall design of the building. The permanent exhibition is situated on all three floors of the building. The monumental staircase joins the three floors in the middle of the exhibition hall. On the second floor are the main entrance, the entrance hall, the temporary exhibition spaces, the museum cafe and offices of the museum staff. On the ground floor are situated conservation spaces, storage space and offices.

The museum building was designed by architects Olaf Küttner and Reijo Louhimo from Olaf Küttner Architects. Küttner was the city architect of Pori from 1951 until his sudden death in 1974. Finlands Museum Association supervised the development of the building. The construction began in October 1971, and the museum opened its doors on “Pori day”, September 29th, 1973.

Source: Satakunta Museum

 

 

Location

Hallituskatu 11, Pori
61.4900294, 21.7913648

Additional media

The main façade, Satakunta Museum
The main façade, Satakunta Museum (© Ari Hietala / Satakunta Museum)
The original perspective drawing by Olaf Küttner Architects, Satakunta Museum
The original perspective drawing by Olaf Küttner Architects, Satakunta Museum (© Satakunta Museum)
The construction site in 1972, Satakunta Museum
The construction site in 1972, Satakunta Museum (© Jari Pyy / Satakunta Museum)
The construction site in 1972, Satakunta Museum
The construction site in 1972, Satakunta Museum (© Hanna Tyvelä)
The main exhibition space in 1973, Satakunta Museum
The main exhibition space in 1973, Satakunta Museum (© Hanna Tyvelä)
The original interior in the cafe, Satakunta Museum
The original interior in the cafe, Satakunta Museum (© Hanna Tyvelä)